Imposter Syndrome

My friend - and emerging voice app guru - Florian Hollandt shared this on Twitter yesterday:

I've been a "professional developer" for over twenty years now...and I have to admit, I still often suffer from imposter syndrome.

There are just too many other people out there doing big, amazing, things with what seems like little to no actual effort. They're just naturals. And wicked smart — way, way smarter than me.

But, the reality is, that's probably only the "social media" truth (well except for the smarter than me bit; that's very likely a simple fact).

Doing big, amazing, things takes time.

It takes connecting what seem like a lot of random, unrelated paths (a fresh perspective). Working through a lot of struggles and wrong turns (experience). And of course, it often takes at least a little bit of luck too (timing).

The 280 character Tweet that finally brings that cool, new, amazing paradigm shifting experience to your attention...that's just the tip of the iceberg (and unless you decide to dive deep into it, you'll prob. never really notice or see even a little bit of the rest of the iceberg under the water there).

...but when you're going through the work, developing your own ideas and skills, it feels like you are baby stepping your way up a mountain (and not getting anywhere fast).

So - yeah - imposter syndrome is a real thing. I think we all suffer from it for time to time — even after years of experience.

But it's also just a little part of what keeps me motivated, wanting to learn more, wanting to get better...and that is something I absolutely embrace.

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This is the personal blog of Kevin Marshall (a.k.a Falicon) where he often digs into side projects he's working on for digdownlabs.com and other random thoughts he's got on his mind.

Kevin also talks in more depth about many of the these things around twice a month via his drip campaign and has a day job as CTO of Veritonic. You can also check out some of his open source code on GitHub or connect with him on Twitter @falicon or via email at kevin at falicon.com.

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