Project love: Peggsite

One of my favorite people I’ve met over the last year is Kirk Love.

I first ran into him in the comments on AVC, but was officially introduced via our mutual friend Whitney McNamara (BTW - NYC tech. is really much smaller than you think but that’s fodder for another, future, post).

Anyway, when we first met I was struggling to figure out what I wanted gawk.it to be…if I wanted to grow it into a huge business (it *still* has that potential) or if I wanted to just keep it as this really interesting little side project (my ultimate personal decision). Meanwhile Kirk was just gearing up to finally get a product built that had been eating away at his brain for a long time now.

Originally, I was excited to connect with him because it appeared we had fundamentally opposing views around content. I’ve always been in the camp of keep everything and make everything searchable/discoverable…he seemed to be in the camp of ‘content should have a very limited shelf-life’.

So I was really looking forward to some smart debate (and of course converting him over to the 'search rules’ and yes let’s keep everything forever camp.)…but as it turns out we never really had that debate (yet).

Instead, he got to telling me about his idea, his motivations, and the emotion that he was trying to figure out and express…I was intrigued.

So much so that I even offered to pitch in with some tech. help if he needed it (he didn’t really as he and his co-founder are handling it all *very* well on their own).

Fast forwarding to about a month ago, Kirk publicly launched his idea…Peggsite.

They explain the service “like Facebook or Tumblr, but without all the noise”…but, at the risk of sounding like a jerk, I think that’s actually all wrong.

Peggsite isn’t like any of those services at all. No.

To me, Peggsite is like MOMA for regular people. Each individual Peggsite like a painting carefully curated and placed within the museum.

It’s not a social network at all, it’s art.

It’s about taking a moment in your life, a feeling you are having, and making art out of it (without having to really be any good at 'creating art’).

And viewing someone’s Peggsite is also like viewing a piece of art.

It’s not about filtering through an endless stream of links, articles, and meaningless banter. No.

It’s about looking at a moment or an emotion someone is sharing…and just absorbing it like you would a Picasso or a Matisse. It’s personal and it’s unique for everyone.

For me, when I view someone’s Peggsite, I feel a stronger emotional connection to that person…as if I’m getting a peek into a moment that mattered to them…and I think, at the core, that’s what Peggsite is really all about.

Art. Emotion. Human connection.

Sure there’s also other parts to it all – his obsession with ephemeral content shines through as your Peggsite can only be one set of things at a given time…when you want to change it, your old version - and the chance for others to admire/experience that moment - is gone. (I’m still on the fence about that situation – though I know he feels strongly about it).

And I don’t know if/how Kirk turns this into a business over the long haul…or if enough people will 'get it’ quick enough to allow him to keep evolving and expanding the service…but I sure hope he does.

If for nothing else than the fact that the internet itself needs more 'art’ like this.

So if you’ve got a few seconds, you should hop out and set up your own Peggsite (free and only takes a few seconds)…and then if you want, swing by my Peggsite and see how I’m currently expressing myself…and then just absorb it and let it sink in for a bit.

I think you’ll love it…at least I do, and i hope you do too.

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This is the personal blog of Kevin Marshall (a.k.a Falicon) where he often digs into side projects he's working on for digdownlabs.com and other random thoughts he's got on his mind.

Kevin has a day job as CTO of Veritonic and is spending nights & weekends hacking on Share Game Tape. You can also check out some of his open source code on GitHub or connect with him on Twitter @falicon or via email at kevin at falicon.com.

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